GENERATION PORN REVIEW

GENERATION PORN REVIEW

Watch GENERATION PORN; an honest and matter of fact documentary series about (guess what) and its far-reaching consequences in the 21st century. The ‘hot’ documentary hit channel 4 on Wednesday night, but you can still catch it on demand.

This documentary will bring you cold hard facts to chew on, as well as some personal anecdotes from millennials. Be prepared for awkward family confessions, funky graphics and a bizarre faux pas in a taxi.

GENERATION PORN CHANNEL 4

Generation Porn uncovers a few revelations about how porn has managed to explode in this decade. It also gives a voice to those who are involved in its production.

The documentary largely follows a handful of Porn stars, the director of porn company ‘Quazar’ and a rather odd father-son franchise who specialise in producing taxi porn (yep, it’s a thing). Intertwined with this are interviews with normal British families who awkwardly discuss porn, on a sofa.

This episode and indeed series are not for the faint-hearted; you do get to see some of the live action. You’ve been warned!

The focal point of the episode was the accessibility of porn for the youth of today. The show successfully highlighted how channels such as ‘YouTube’ have incidentally given birth to porn channels with free content. Chillingly, it was repeated a few times in the programme that “the internet is made for porn”. This was aptly evidenced by the grin of the ‘Fake Taxi’ founder as he explained that his paycheque was in the 7 figures.

Despite the gauche comments about ‘wet floors’ and the awkward family conversations, I really liked this documentary. The visual explanation of how porn has shattered the century was eye opening to say the least. It was interesting how the programme drew parallels between a sixth former sitting on the UK sofa and two young American women involved as ‘porn stars.

The documentary successfully portrayed the highly lucrative nature of the porn industry without managing to unnecessarily glamourize it. The girls involved in its making are presented as down to earth, likeable women - not objects which was fairly refreshing and real. Whether you’re a concerned parent, an eager Millennial, or just about anyone else then I would recommend giving this a watch.

So far, this seems to be the most relevant documentary about porn in this century that I have seen so far. Rather than focusing on the laborious and I-don’t-want-to-know processes involved in the making of the porn, the emphasis of the programme lay on the younger generations’ obsession with it.

There wasn’t much glitz and glam, just an abundance of awkwardness all round, a couple of wet floors and a lot of relevant facts.

- You can catch up on All4.